Boutis

I have loved this beautiful type of hand quilting for a long time. This is my first project.

Boutis is a french type of quilting.   Two layers of thin batiste fabric are layered together and the design is quilted with a small quilting (or running) stitch.   A #22 or #24 tapestry needle is threaded with a quilting thread.  This loop then carries a cotton yarn.   The cotton yarn is drawn through all of the channels and the design areas “stuffing” them.   The boutis is transparent when held up to the light. Beautiful quilts and clothing were made long ago by talented french women using this technique.

A couple of my friends living in France (Maggy and Nicole) sent me several books and patterns.   Nicole sent me a lovely boutis piece she made as a gift.   She also wrote to me and explained the process.   I didn’t read the instructions properly and didn’t know about the needle looped with thread. Unfortunately I threaded a needle which was TOO long directly with the yarn.    This made my holes much too large and some are still visible.    And I really didn’t know what to do when I finished.   Luckily I found a lovely blog and Elizabeth was kind enough to help me out and answer my many questions regarding boutis.

I also made the mistake of beginning to pull the yarn through on the right side of the project rather than on the wrong side…hence you can see the holes I left by using a skewer to assist in the “stuffing”… my needle was actually all I needed.   Hopefully next time my piece will look a LOT better.  Trial and Error!!!

Sending you BEST WISHES FOR A HAPPY THANKSGIVING!

Amities, Averyclaire

Remake

A few years ago I designed an “au naturel” wool Christmas stocking for my DIL who loves nature and the great outdoors (specifically sunflowers). Here is the first one I made:

She asked for a little more “bling” and perhaps something red…so I took off the top sunflower and added a cardinal, a few snowflakes, an aspen tree (they live in Colorado), and a pretty little gift under the tree and some “glittzy” sequins sprinkled all around.

I think she’s going to like this one:

And now I am working on one for one year old Maya….shhh.

Amities, Averyclaire

Sunflower Inn Modified

When I saw this needlework pattern, I knew that I had to have it and modify it to fit the gift I planned.   My son and daughter-in-law have overnight guests at their home nearly every weekend.   And she adores sunflowers.   In her guest room she always has small vases of sunflowers or sunflower-like flowers.   The pattern words said “Sunflower Inn.”   So I modified it by adding the line to say “Mike and Mich’s Sunflower Inn.”    I can’t wait to give it to them.   Of course it still needs framing, but at least the stitching is done.   This is a “Little House Needleworks” pattern appropriately named Sunflower Inn.  I stitched it on 32 ct Belfast cream linen with DMC and Weeks Dye Works threads.   It worked up fairly quickly and I am delighted with the result.   I am quite sure that the Christmas surprise will be a special one.

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My photos of needlework never seem to come out with true colors.   Do any of you photographers out there have some suggestions for me and my point and shoot camera?    I usually lay my pieces on a black velvet board to take the photos.   I have tried a couple of the different settings on the camera but can’t seem to get just the right one.   I have an Olympus 1010.   I’d appreciate any advice anyone can give.

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Here’s a closeup of one of the little sunflowers.   I love it.   Well…on to the next project. 

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A Lovely English Lady

This beginning note is a testament to a lovely English lady. She taught me to knit booties for my dolls when I was seven and then scarves and mittens. The love of needles, thread, yarn, and fabric simply infused me. Clara Avery was my grandmother. The reason I have textile art in my soul is all because of her. I will be forever grateful and indebted to her passion for the gentle art of using one’s hands.

Like so many others, I cannot pass up a shimmering skein of floss, the smell and feel of a new bolt of fabric, the blissfully soft touch of furry angora yarn.