French Boutis Scissor Case

French Boutis is an ancient form of French quilted needlework. Traditionally it is all white on white, but I adore the bright Provencal colors and created this SCISSOR CASE to entice people to learn this art. It is done with a small running stitch and a back stitch on two pieces of batiste, then yarn is drawn through the channels to give it a raised relief. I am working VERY hard to bring this art to the USA. I teach classes for a minimal fee and sell beginner kits on my ETSY AVERYCLAIRE page. The kit is available in a variety of colors (8 different colors) and includes everything you need to complete one scissor case. Please tell your quilting and needlework groups!

UPDATE:  This pattern calls for a silk covered snap. I have provided the materials in the kit, but I put the tutorial at the top of this page for all to use.

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French Boutis

The past month or so I have been avidly working on designing more French Boutis patterns.  Today I published one just in time for Valentine’s Day on my Etsy site.

double-heart-boutis

This French needlework technique is easy to do if you like handwork. Stitching the piece is rather like hand quilting, a small running stitch, on two pieces of batiste. Then the boutis yarn is drawn through the channels by inserting a tapestry needle from the back between the two layers of fabric. Voila!

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In my kit I provide the pattern, instructions with photos and finishing technique, the white and pink batiste needed to complete two hearts, a white sun catcher and a pink sachet.  Also included are the two needles necessary for stitching and toothpicks needed for stuffing in the tail ends of the yarn cording.  Other materials you provide are white and pink thread, a ribbon or cord for finishing, and filling for your sachet.

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I am working on about six other designs as well.  If you love handwork and would love to try this ancient French Needlework Art, give it a try.  There is also a digital pattern available. It’s a small piece, easy to work up quickly…just in time for Valentine’s Day! I also teach French Boutis to anyone interested.

Thank you to my dear French friends, Nicole, who introduced me to this beautiful art nearly 15 years ago with a gift for my newly born granddaughter, to Maggy and Nicole, who have supplied me with lots of books and magazines for inspiration, to Elisabeth, who sent me a piece of her own hand worked Boutis, and last but not least to Elizabeth from Canada at Seams French who shares this passion with me!

Please leave a comment and let me know what you think! (The comment form is at the top of the page under the date)

Stay tuned for more finishing work next time!

Amities, Averyclaire

 

Boutis

I have loved this beautiful type of hand quilting for a long time. This is my first project.

Boutis is a french type of quilting.   Two layers of thin batiste fabric are layered together and the design is quilted with a small quilting (or running) stitch.   A #22 or #24 tapestry needle is threaded with a quilting thread.  This loop then carries a cotton yarn.   The cotton yarn is drawn through all of the channels and the design areas “stuffing” them.   The boutis is transparent when held up to the light. Beautiful quilts and clothing were made long ago by talented french women using this technique.

A couple of my friends living in France (Maggy and Nicole) sent me several books and patterns.   Nicole sent me a lovely boutis piece she made as a gift.   She also wrote to me and explained the process.   I didn’t read the instructions properly and didn’t know about the needle looped with thread. Unfortunately I threaded a needle which was TOO long directly with the yarn.    This made my holes much too large and some are still visible.    And I really didn’t know what to do when I finished.   Luckily I found a lovely blog and Elizabeth was kind enough to help me out and answer my many questions regarding boutis.

I also made the mistake of beginning to pull the yarn through on the right side of the project rather than on the wrong side…hence you can see the holes I left by using a skewer to assist in the “stuffing”… my needle was actually all I needed.   Hopefully next time my piece will look a LOT better.  Trial and Error!!!

Sending you BEST WISHES FOR A HAPPY THANKSGIVING!

Amities, Averyclaire

Remake

A few years ago I designed an “au naturel” wool Christmas stocking for my DIL who loves nature and the great outdoors (specifically sunflowers). Here is the first one I made:

She asked for a little more “bling” and perhaps something red…so I took off the top sunflower and added a cardinal, a few snowflakes, an aspen tree (they live in Colorado), and a pretty little gift under the tree and some “glittzy” sequins sprinkled all around.

I think she’s going to like this one:

And now I am working on one for one year old Maya….shhh.

Amities, Averyclaire